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Addiction: The microbiome link

“Abuse of cocaine is a serious problem in America,” says Weinstock. “Cocaine is involved in more than a third of emergency-room visits for drug misuse or abuse. And because it shares characteristics with many other addictive substances, our findings could apply to opioid and other addictions.”

The National Institute on Drug Abuse has made a $4M grant to JAX scientists to explore the roles of the microbiome and genetics in substance use disorders.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has funded a bold new approach to understanding the biology of substance abuse, with a five-year grant totaling $3,967,656 to Jackson Laboratory (JAX) researchers exploring the role of the microbiome and genetics in substance use disorders.

“This study will be the first to delineate the genetic basis of drug addiction by integrating host genetics and the gut microbiome.”

 

Sources:
The Jackson Laboratory
MetroHartford Alliance

 

How the Microbiome Supports Health

“Inside our bodies, there is a microscopic world teeming with life known as the microbiome. From the moment we are born, we begin accumulating a collection of helpful bacteria, viruses and fungi that support our immune system and digestive health.

Nichole Broderick, an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Connecticut has received a five-year, $1.92 million grant from the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences to build up the knowledge base of how exactly the microbiome performs these functions.”

Good Bacteria, Bad Bacteria: Uncovering How the Microbiome Supports Health